Tag Archives: GINA

Sometimes You Just Cannot Make This Stuff Up

Warning: The following is true. Some readers may find the content disturbing. Reader discretion is advised. We have previously stated, although in somewhat tongue-in-cheek fashion, that labor and employment is the “TMZ” of the legal world. While that metaphoric comparison may be open for debate, many human resources professionals and employment law practitioners know that … Continue reading this entry

New FMLA Forms Are Here Just in Time for Summer!

You can sleep a little easier tonight — you no longer have to worry about using expired Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) forms. On May 27, 2015, the United States Department of Labor (DOL) quietly updated its FMLA forms with a new expiration date of May 31, 2018. In addition to the … Continue reading this entry

EEOC Issues Final GINA Recordkeeping Rules

In our January 16, 2012 edition of Legal News: Employment Law Update, we discussed companies’ numerous obligations with respect to employee recordkeeping. On February 12, 2012, the EEOC added another set of requirements into the mix, issuing its final recordkeeping rules for the Genetic Information Non Discrimination Act (GINA).… Continue reading this entry

Safe Harbors Emerge for Employers Under New GINA Regulations

The Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) was signed into law by President George W. Bush in May 2008 and became effective in November 2009. Title II of GINA prohibits employers with 15 or more employees, unions, employment agencies, and joint apprenticeship programs from discriminating against an individual based on his or her “genetic … Continue reading this entry

EEOC Issues Final Regulations Interpreting GINA

On November 8, 2010, the EEOC issued final regulations interpreting the federal Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA), which prohibits employers from requesting, requiring, or purchasing an individual’s genetic information or using genetic information to make employment decisions. The new regulations, which will take effect in approximately 60 days, clarify several of GINA’s definitions and provide … Continue reading this entry