DHS To Issue New I-9 Form After Recently Increasing Penalties For I-9 Violations


Just when employers were becoming more comfortable with the complex and lengthy Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification that was issued in 2013, the federal government has decided to turn up the heat. First, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice recently increased the penalties for I-9 violations. Second, DHS has announced that it will soon issue a new version of the Form I-9. These actions bring significant changes for employers. Continue reading this entry

The DOL's New Rx for Federal Contractor Employees


We have reported time and time again on the national trend of mandating paid sick leave for workers. As we noted last March, in a 2015 Executive Order, President Obama directed the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) to issue regulations requiring federal contractors to provide paid sick leave to their employees. The DOL issued a final rule on September 29, 2016, which will mandate up to seven days of paid sick leave for covered workers. Continue reading this entry

Decision 2016: A Refresher on Politics in Your Workplace


Over the next few weeks, millions of Americans will cast their votes, concluding what has been a particularly contentious election cycle. Until then, as Election Day approaches and employees’ political passions continue to rise, employers should be mindful of their rights and obligations when it comes to voting and politics in the workplace. Continue reading this entry

SCOTUS Sends Auto Workers Back to Circuit Court for Overtime Regulation “Repairs”


You may not even know the technical name for workers at the local car dealership who diagnose what is wrong with your vehicle and tell you how it can be repaired. They are called auto service advisors, and whether they are entitled to overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) has been the subject of controversy for nearly 50 years.

A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding these auto service advisors’ exempt status holds lessons with broader applicability regarding the weight courts will give Department of Labor (DOL) regulations. Continue reading this entry

Limit Your Pre-Employment Inquiries to Job-Related Questions


As most employers know, it is unlawful to ask an employment or promotion candidate questions which reflect bias based on race, color, age, gender, religion, or any other protected status. For example, a candidate cannot be asked about their race, age/date of birth, religion, marital status, pregnancy, children, or plans for a family. Hiring decisions cannot be based on stereotypes or assumptions about a person’s protected status. Employers and all hiring managers should be aware of these restrictions before any interview takes place.   Continue reading this entry