Tag Archives: Reasonable Accommodation

The Sliding Scale of Reasonable Accommodations

We have previously discussed how to protect against religious discrimination claims and best practices when addressing requests for religious accommodations. A recent decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (covering Oklahoma, Kansas, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah) reminds employers that the offered religious accommodation truly has to be “reasonable,” and … Continue reading this entry

No Coach Necessary for Potty-Mouth Employee

As we have recently noted, and as many employers have probably bemoaned a time or two, sometimes it feels like the legal concept of “reasonable accommodation” has little to do with real-world notions of what is reasonable, particularly when courts are telling employees they might have to allow admitted employee theft as such an accommodation. … Continue reading this entry

Does “Reasonable Accommodation” Have Nothing to Do With “Essential Job Functions”?

Since the original passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act (“ADA”) in 1990, employers have come to know that they generally have an obligation to reasonably accommodate a qualified individual with a disability, presumably to enable him or her to perform the essential functions of the job. Indeed, with the more recent 2008 passage of … Continue reading this entry