Tag Archives: Sixth Circuit

EEOC, Court Flip Flops Reveal Challenges to Employers Facing Accommodation Requests

If even the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the courts cannot agree how far the Americans with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) accommodation obligation extends, how is an employer supposed to do so? As we noted recently, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals (covering Kentucky Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee) has determined that the obligation does … Continue reading this entry

Common Sense Prevails: Working From Home Sometimes Will Not Work

Well, phew. We like when legal developments we believe raise troubling questions with problematic implications later develop into something seemingly more rational based on the intersection of law and logic. One such pleasant development occurred last week, when a federal appellate court reversed an earlier decision suggesting employers could no longer require many workers to … Continue reading this entry

Unlike Diamonds, You Cannot Presume Retiree Medical Benefits Are Forever

Employer
Last week, the United States Supreme Court issued a decision that gives unionized employers in Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee, and Kentucky greater ability to modify medical benefits they provide to retirees pursuant to current and prior collective bargaining agreements. Employers in these states were previously subject to the unique case law from the United States Court of … Continue reading this entry