Tag Archives: Texas

Court Strikes Down Austin’s Paid Sick Leave Ordinance

Paid
Earlier this year, the city of Austin became the first Texas city to join the growing number of localities throughout the nation passing legislation requiring employers to provide paid sick leave to their employees.  However, this past Friday, November 16, 2018, the Austin-based 3rd Court of Appeals issued an opinion that will prevent the local … Continue reading this entry

Top 5 Mistakes Employers Make with Their Employee Handbooks

As 2016 winds down and a new year approaches, now is a great time for employers to think about their employee handbooks and employment policies in general.  As employers go about that thought-process, here are a few common mistakes employers should try to avoid: (1) Self-Regulation:  Employers often include items in handbooks that are not … Continue reading this entry

2016: They Say all Politics is Local: Now Employment Law is Too

Paid Family Leave
The end of 2016 is a good time to review and consider a subtle shift in employment law which appears to be gaining momentum. The shift, which may be imperceptible at first, could prove to have lasting impact on employers, especially those who operate in multiple cities and states, and can easily be described as … Continue reading this entry

OSHA Update—Surge in Enforcement Efforts to Reduce Amputations Hazards in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) recently announced that it will have a “heightened focus” on amputation hazards in Region 6, which comprises Arkansas Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas.  OSHA reports that 2,600 amputations occurred nationwide in 2015, most of which were in the manufacturing industry.  OSHA’s goal in this initiative will be on increased … Continue reading this entry

Two Lawsuits Hope to Put the Brakes on Overtime Rule Changes

Wage and Hour
With a December 1 deadline looming, millions of employers across the country are scrambling to implement new compensation and classification practices in response to the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) new overtime rule, announced in May. This past Tuesday, a duo of federal lawsuits was filed in Texas as a response to strong objections from … Continue reading this entry

Legal Considerations for Employers during Election Years—Part I

According to the Texas Secretary of State, 73.75% of the voting age population in Texas is registered to vote this year.  Tex. Sec’y of State, Turnout and Voter Registration Figures (1970-current), available here.  Frankly, an even higher percentage probably has an opinion about a candidate or issue, regardless of whether they will cast a vote.  … Continue reading this entry

Being a HERO: Six Things You Need to Know About the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance

It’s been described as “an opportunity for sexual predators to have access to our families” and “an historic non-discrimination ordinance.” But rhetoric aside, the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (“HERO”) is the law in the Bayou City. So what’s it mean for your business? You can (and should) read the complete ordinance, but here are six … Continue reading this entry

Is There a Doctor in the House...Outside His or Her Restricted Territory?

Should physicians be subject to a different noncompete standards than other professionals? Several states have established laws, through statute and case law, on the topic of physician non-competes, and yet we are still far from a consensus.… Continue reading this entry

The Times They Might Be A-Changin' in Georgia, Massachusetts and Illinois

As many of us in the noncompete world are aware, the law of noncompetes is constantly evolving and changing, sometimes by court decisions like the Sheshunoff decision in Texas, and sometimes by statute, like in Oregon. There are three legislatures currently considering new noncompete bills: Georgia, Illinois and Massachusetts (linked to my good friend and … Continue reading this entry