Tag Archives: U.S. Supreme Court

Employers’ Diversity Data and Initiatives: Trade Secret or Open Book?

diversity
As many companies prepare to submit their annual “EEO-1” reports to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission revealing their workforce statistics by race and gender for their U.S.-based employees by EEO job category, they face the increasing possibility that this information will become public. The decision last week by a federal district court vacating the administrative … Continue reading this entry

What Employers With Affirmative Action Policies Need to Know About a Recent Supreme Court Decision

Many employers who have read about the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent affirmative action decision are wondering what impact, if any, the ruling will have on them. After all, the main issue in that case was the propriety of a university’s affirmative action plan — specifically, its consideration of prospective students’ races in its admissions process. … Continue reading this entry

Appellate Courts Set the Supreme Court Stage for Waiver Showdown?

Many of our readers are no strangers to the ongoing legal battle over the enforcement of arbitration agreements containing class action waivers. While the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has steadfastly maintained its position that such agreements interfere with employees’ rights to engage in protected concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), federal … Continue reading this entry

From The Jaws Of Defeat, Public Unions Snatch Lucky Victory

FEHC
For many years, unions representing public employees in a variety of states have continued to require employees to pay union dues even if they have an objection to certain political, lobbying, or other activities the unions engage in. However, the permissibility of such requirements looked likely to disappear via a Supreme Court ruling this term. … Continue reading this entry

The Impact of Justice Scalia’s Passing on Pending Supreme Court Cases

SupremeCourt
The country was shocked to hear of the recent passing of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Legal scholars and political commentators have since written extensively on Justice Scalia’s contributions to the legal world and his sometimes polarizing opinions. Justice Scalia’s passing will doubtlessly have a significant impact on the Supreme Court, as will the eventual … Continue reading this entry

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell? When It Comes to Religious Accommodation, the Supreme Court Offers Guidance (Well, Sort Of… )

EEO Compliance
What if it looks like someone may need a religious accommodation, but the individual never asks? Does the company still have a duty to accommodate? In a much awaited opinion, the Supreme Court, in an 8-1 decision, determined that “they never asked” does not necessarily let an employer off the hook. Employers subject to Title VII … Continue reading this entry

Supreme Court Calls Out the EEOC for Arguing It Alone Can Determine Whether It Followed the Law

We suggested last year that if you felt paranoid that the federal agencies seemed out to get employers, perhaps it was not paranoia at all. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) spate of recent lawsuits — or at least its apparent haste to sue employers and make examples out of them over such things as … Continue reading this entry

Department of Labor Announces Expansion of FMLA Rights to Same-Sex Couples

The United States Department of Labor issued a groundbreaking rule change last week, granting couples in legal, same-sex marriages the same rights as those in opposite-sex marriages under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). The FMLA, which was enacted in 1993, allows eligible employees to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons, … Continue reading this entry